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On-Demand
Webinar
1.5
02/01/2024

Clean-Up on IL-23: Integrating the Science of Inflammatory Targets into Treatment Decision-making in IBD

This CME Outfitters Webcast, entitled Clean-Up on IL-23: Integrating the Science of Inflammatory Targets into Treatment Decision-making in IBD, will feature an expert panel discussion on the science behind cytokine-targeting therapies and will utilize animated 3-D models to discuss therapeutic mechanisms of action (MOAs) of emerging agents, clinical distinctions between therapies, and individualizing treatments for lasting outcomes for patients with IBD.

1.5
02/01/2024

Maria T. Abreu

Maria T. Abreu, MD is a Gastroenterologist who specializes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). She completed her medical degree at the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. Her postdoctoral training included an internship and residency in medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and a clinical and research fellowship in gastroenterology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Maria T. Abreu

Maria T. Abreu, MD is a Gastroenterologist who specializes in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). She completed her medical degree at the University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine. Her postdoctoral training included an internship and residency in medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and a clinical and research fellowship in gastroenterology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). Dr. Abreu is the Director of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center, Professor of Medicine, and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine in Miami, Florida.

Dr. Abreu has more than 20 years of leadership experience in basic, translational, and clinical research and mentoring. She was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in 2010 and, in 2018, to the Association of American Physicians (AAP). She completed a three-year term as Chair of the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IOIBD) in 2022. In 2019, she was elected Councilor-at-Large of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Governing Board for a term of three years. Most recently, she is President-Elect of the AGA, on the path to becoming President in 2024. She will be the fifth woman and first Latina to hold this position.

Dr. Abreu is a recipient of the 2019 Sherman Prize by The Bruce and Cynthia Sherman Charitable Foundation, which recognizes outstanding achievements in IBD. In 2020, she received the Mentoring Award from the Immunology, Microbiology, and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IMIBD) section of the AGA. In the Fall of 2020, she received the Healio’s Lifetime Disruptor Award. This award goes to a gastroenterologist or hepatologist who consistently pushed the gastroenterology field forward through innovative treatments, practice management, patient care, or research. She is the 30th alumnus inducted into the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Hall of Fame. Dr. Abreu is frequently invited as a speaker (in English and Spanish) at symposia on basic science and clinical topics all over the world. She has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, books, chapters, and reviews.

Jessica R. Allegretti

Jessica R. Allegretti, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, and is the Medical Director of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where she built and leads the Clinical Trials Program and Fecal Microbiota Transplant Program.

Jessica R. Allegretti

Jessica R. Allegretti, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in the Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, and is the Medical Director of the Crohn’s and Colitis Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where she built and leads the Clinical Trials Program and Fecal Microbiota Transplant Program. Dr. Allegretti graduated from The Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami in Miami, Florida, trained in internal medicine at Massachusetts’s General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, and completed her gastroenterology fellowship training at Brigham and Women’s Hospital before joining faculty there. She later went on to receive a Master of Public Health degree from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts.

Dr. Allegretti is a physician-scientist dedicated to discovering and developing innovative microbiome therapeutics and novel treatments for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Her research focus is on the mechanism recurrent C.difficile infection (CDI) and the intersection of CDI and IBD. She has authored more than 100 peer-reviewed publications. She has received funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the American College of Gastroenterology and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation. Dr. Allegretti has been featured on Home Box Office (HBO), British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC), Netflix, the New York Times and numerous other media outlets. In 2020, Dr. Allegretti received the Sherman Emerging Leader Prize for Excellence in Crohn’s and Colitis (IBD).

David T. Rubin

David T. Rubin, MD, FACG, AGAF, FACP, FASGE, FRCP (Edinburgh) is the Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine, a Professor of Pathology, Chief of the Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and Director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Center at the University of Chicago Medicine in Chicago, Illinois.

David T. Rubin

David T. Rubin, MD, FACG, AGAF, FACP, FASGE, FRCP (Edinburgh) is the Joseph B. Kirsner Professor of Medicine, a Professor of Pathology, Chief of the Section of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, and Director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Center at the University of Chicago Medicine in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Rubin earned a medical degree with honors at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine in Chicago, Illinois and completed his residency in internal medicine and fellowships in gastroenterology and clinical medical ethics at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, where he served as Chief Resident and Chief Fellow. He also serves as Associate Faculty at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, Associate Investigator at the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, and is a member of the University of Chicago Committee on Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacogenomics. He is the chair of the National Scientific Advisory Committee of the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, where he also serves as a Board of Trustees member. Dr. Rubin is the deputy chair of the Executive Committee of the International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Prior to these appointments, he served as the Director of the Fellowship in Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition at the University of Chicago for 11 years. In 2018, Dr. Rubin completed the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Leadership Development Course for Physicians.

Dr. Rubin is a Fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG), the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), the American College of Physicians (ACP), and the Royal College of Physicians (Edinburgh). He is on the Board of Trustees for the ACG. Among numerous awards and honors, Dr. Rubin was chosen by his peers as a member of Best Doctors (recognized for superior clinical ability) and America’s Top Physicians (gastroenterology). Additionally, he twice received the ACG’s Governor’s Award of Excellence in Clinical Research (2003 and 2013), and the UChicago Postgraduate Teaching Award in recognition of significant contributions for fellowship education (2006). In 2012, he received the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation’s Rosenthal Award, a national leadership award bestowed upon a volunteer who has contributed in an indisputable way to the quality of life of patients and families. He has previously served as an Associate Editor of the journal Gastroenterology and Editor-in-Chief of the ACG On-Line Education Universe. In 2020, Dr. Rubin received the Sherman Prize for Excellence in Crohn’s and Colitis.

Dr. Rubin is an editor of a best-selling book Curbside Consultation in IBD, now in its 3rd edition, was an associate editor of the 11th edition and is senior editor of the upcoming 12th edition of Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease, and an author or coauthor of over 500 articles on treatment and management of IBD, cancer in IBD and novel paradigms, as well as the first author of the 2019 ACG Guidelines for ulcerative colitis. His current research is in the area of novel approaches to monitoring of IBD (wearables and point of care intestinal ultrasound), prevention of progressive complications from uncontrolled inflammation, and a variety of collaborative and translational studies related to the causes of IBD and its complications. His H index is 74. He is also a featured media contact for issues related to IBD, appearing on satellite radio, television, print media and maintains a popular and verified twitter feed @IBDMD with over 20,000 followers.

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On-Demand
Infographic
1
02/01/2024

Opioid Use Disorder: Identifying Patients At Risk and Developing Management Plans

Patients and health care professionals (HCPs) face additional challenges when the treatments prescribed for pain management (e.g., opioids) lead to substance use problems. HCPs must then re-evaluate treatment plans for acute, subacute, and chronic pain and encourage treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD). There are strategies available to HCPs to help identify patients at risk for OUD, most notably found in the 2022 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids, which could help prevent OUD in patients through screening and identifying alternate treatments. For those patients who may present with concern for OUD, HCPs should be able to apply Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders’ (DSM)-5 criteria to properly diagnose OUD and work with patients to initiate effective treatment plans for OUD.

An interactive infographic from CME Outfitters entitled, Opioid Use Disorder: Identifying Patients At Risk and Developing Management Plans, consisting of three “escape-room” style activities, will be presented to show learners tools to identify patients at risk for OUD, diagnose patients with OUD, and develop treatment plans for the underlying pain as well as the subsequent OUD. The three rooms will model practice environments with challenges designed by a team of expert, interdisciplinary faculty that cover strategies from the 2022 CDC Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for screening and identifying patients at risk for OUD, as well as ways to diagnose and treat OUD.

1
02/01/2024

Johnathan H. Goree, MD

Johnathan H. Goree, MD

Melissa J. Durham

Melissa J. Durham is an Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and an Associate Dean at the University of Southern California (USC) Mann School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Melissa J. Durham

Melissa J. Durham is an Associate Professor of Clinical Pharmacy and an Associate Dean at the University of Southern California (USC) Mann School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.  Dr. Durham received her Doctor of Pharmacy degree, completed a residency in Community-based Pharmacy Practice, and has a Master of Academic Medicine degree, all from USC. She has been a clinical pharmacist at the USC Pain Center since 2008, where she runs a pharmacist-led pain medication management service for patients with a variety of complicated chronic, nononcologic pain conditions. She is dedicated to improving the quality of life for people with chronic pain through patient-centered and compassionate care. The value of her unique practice model has been recognized and published both nationally and internationally. Dr. Durham is also a practicing community pharmacist and provides a valuable and unique perspective of a clinician who is both a prescriber and a dispenser.

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On-Demand
Briefcase
0.75
02/01/2024

Anticoagulation Considerations in Renally-Impaired Patients with NVAF or VTE: Case Simulations and Commentary

Anticoagulation for renally-impaired individuals with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) or venous thromboembolism (VTE) often entails balancing the risk of vascular events (e.g., stroke, pulmonary embolism) with the dangers of excess bleeding. In this CME Outfitters BriefCase series, two expert clinicians – a cardiologist and a nephrologist, view 4 short patient care videos in real-time. After each vignette, they provide frank and candid commentary punctuated by clinical tips and pearls you can use in your own practice.

Among the topics covered: Should stroke and VTE prophylaxis take precedent over the risk of bleeding? Should advanced age and risk of falls be contraindications to anticoagulation? Are direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) considered first-line in 2024 – and for which patients?  Does chronic kidney disease (CKD) warrant lower DOAC and/or warfarin doses in patients with NVAF or VTE? How does an individual’s social determinants of health inform shared decision-making when it comes to choices in anticoagulation?

Please join us for Anticoagulation Considerations in Renally-Impaired Patients with NVAF or VTE: Case Simulations and Commentary and learn how to strike the right balance for your own renally-impaired patients with NVAF or VTE.

0.75
02/01/2024

John W. Stanifer, MD, MSc

John W. Stanifer, MD, MSc

Manesh R. Patel, MD

Manesh R. Patel, MD

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On-Demand
CME Snack
0.75
02/01/2024

Balancing Act: Optimizing Anticoagulation Care in Renally-Impaired Patients with NVAF or VTE

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common comorbidity among patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and/or venous thromboembolism (VTE). Paradoxically, declining kidney function increases both thromboembolic and bleeding risks in patients with these conditions, requiring a fragile balance when implementing anticoagulation therapy to prevent ischemic stroke, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. Adding to the complexity of decision-making is a paucity of robust study results, as patients with CKD were often excluded from large anticoagulation clinical trials for patients with NVAF and VTE. Fortunately, newer studies and a wealth of real-world experience now provide practical guidance to optimize quality of care and outcomes. In particular, some of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have shown significant safety and efficacy versus warfarin in many patients with CKD and NVAF/VTE, but these therapies are still underused or underdosed because of clinician concern for increased bleeding.

In this CME Outfitters activity, experts in cardiology and nephrology discuss the challenges of striking the ideal risk-benefit ratio in anticoagulation for renally-impaired patients with NVAF or VTE. They explore the roles that shared decision making and recognition of each patient’s social determinants of health play in improving adherence to therapies. Importantly, the faculty demonstrates how cultural humility and awareness of implicit bias, particularly in communities of color, can improve equitable care and ensure best outcomes.

0.75
02/01/2024

John W. Stanifer, MD, MSc

John W. Stanifer, MD, MSc

Manesh R. Patel, MD

Manesh R. Patel, MD

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On-Demand
Webcast
1.5
02/01/2024

Out of the Shadows: Starting the Conversation About Bowel Urgency in Patients with Crohn’s Disease

Studies demonstrate that approximately 65%-82% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) report at least some degree of bowel urgency, but this symptom is largely underrecognized by gastroenterologists and health care professionals (HCPs) caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There is a lack of awareness and appreciation of the impact of bowel urgency in patients with CD as it is most commonly associated with ulcerative colitis. Bowel urgency in patients with CD results in emotional and social stress, leading to stigma, feelings of isolation, and impacting all aspects of daily life for patients. Bowel urgency is not widely incorporated into clinical assessment indices or clinical trial endpoints for CD, despite being a pivotal symptom influencing patient health-related QoL (HRQoL) and a potential indicator of uncontrolled intestinal inflammation.

 

In this CMEO Outfitters recorded symposium, expert faculty discuss recognizing the frequency of bowel urgency in patients with CD and the impact on patient QoL, incorporating assessments for bowel urgency through symptom evaluation, and engaging patients in open communication about their bowel urgency as part of shared decision-making in order to improve clinical outcomes, and the faculty also review real-world patient cases.

 

1.5
02/01/2024

Marla Dubinsky, MD

Marla Dubinsky, MD

Moderator

Tauseef Ali, MD, FACP, FACG, AGAF

Tauseef Ali, MD, FACP, FACG, AGAF

Millie D. Long

Millie D. Long, MD, MPH, is board certified in internal medicine, preventive medicine, and gastroenterology. Dr. Long received her medical degree from University of Virginia in 2002

Millie D. Long

Millie D. Long, MD, MPH, is board certified in internal medicine, preventive medicine, and gastroenterology. Dr. Long received her medical degree from University of Virginia in 2002. She then completed residency in internal medicine and a chief residency at University of Alabama at Birmingham. She completed fellowships in gastroenterology and hepatology, preventive medicine, and inflammatory bowel disease, all at University of North Carolina. She is currently Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine and Director of the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Fellowship Program at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. Long’s clinical practice is at the UNC Multidisciplinary Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) Center. Her research interests include prevention of complications of IBD, women’s health, and clinical epidemiology. Dr. Long has contributed to over 200 peer-reviewed publications, book chapters, and review articles and to the medical literature. She is the current co-Editor in Chief of the American Journal of Gastroenterology. She also serves as an invited reviewer for journals such as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and Gastroenterology.

Dr. Long is a fellow of the American College of Gastroenterology, where she serves on the Board of Trustees. She is also a fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association and the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, where she co-chairs the Clinical Research Alliance.

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On-Demand
Podcast
0.5
02/01/2024

Planning Ahead: Maintenance Therapy in Endometrial Cancer

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer (EC) who did not respond to first-line treatment with chemotherapy.  This led to several new trials of emerging therapies, including studies to determine if progression-free survival (PFS) could be improved with the addition of chemotherapy.

With the advent of ICI therapy and emerging ICI combination therapies, clinicians need to have knowledge of where and how maintenance therapy may play a role in improving PFS in EC.  During this podcast, international gynecologic cancer experts Drs. Richard Penson and Nicoletta Colombo discuss the most recent data from these EC trials, focusing on how it has changed recommended practice patterns and how it should be incorporated into the care of patients with EC.

0.5
02/01/2024

Nicoletta Colombo, MD, PhD

Nicoletta Colombo, MD, PhD

Richard T. Penson

Richard T. Penson, MD, MRCP, is a Medical Oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. A key opinion leader, Dr. Penson was a longstanding member of the Gynecologic Oncology Group Ovarian and Quality of Life Committees and now serves on the Foundation’s Investigator Council.

Richard T. Penson

(Moderator)

Richard T. Penson, MD, MRCP, is a Medical Oncologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. A key opinion leader, Dr. Penson was a longstanding member of the Gynecologic Oncology Group Ovarian and Quality of Life Committees and now serves on the Foundation’s Investigator Council. He is the national Principal Investigator (PI) of the olaparib registration trial (SOLO-2) and the international PI of SOLO3, and the OVAL trial. He has taught on Harvard’s Practice of Medicine Course, the Bigelow General Medical Service at Massachusetts General Hospital, and is one of the Chairs of the Institutional Review Board of Dana-Farber Harvard Cancer Center.